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's an on for to welcome president obama home. like every major city, chicago faces two challenges, the strength of our school and the safety of our streets. our streets will only be as safe as our schools are strong, and our families are sound. after decades of debate, our children now have a full school day and a full school year, equal to the measure of their potential. we have created five new high schools, partnered with major tech companies, to educate students. all the way to a community college degree and focus on science and technology and math and engineering. just like the one the president mentioned in new york, in his state of the union address. new york has one, chicago has five, but who's counting? the reforms we have brought to early childhood education and our community colleges and our college to career program, aligned with the president's agenda as he laid it out in the state of the union address. for our children, to live up to their potential, we have to live up to our obligations to them with greater investment in after-school programs, job training, as well as mentoring programs
was there is this requirement at the time, gun safety class, which was five hours long, and you could not teach it in the city because it requires an hour at the range so you had to leave the city. there were really no restrictions. it was open ended on who could teach it, where they could teach it. it was all these men teaching it in these homes. it made me feel very unsafe. i couldn't find an instructor. in the end the city council, because of reading all this, exposing all this, the city made it virtually impossible for people to get guns in the city, the city council passed a law this year that took away that requirement, that five-hour class. and a couple other small requirements, but there's still 11 steps to gun ownership in washington which is only down from 17 when i did it. host: emily miller, who is charles sykes and what's his role in the gun-buying process in d.c.? guest: well, charles sykes is the one legal gun dealer in washington, d.c., and he's been doing it for years. he does not buy and sell. he has a very unique role which is transferring the guns, because federal law says you have to have
responsibilities were during her years at ci -- years at citi. these are important questions. if you are confirmed -- if you are confirmed, you will be responsible for overseeing the implementation of the very practices undertaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, you will be responsible for coordinating a limitation of the so-called -- volkcker rule. you have stated that you support that rule. if you are to be confirmed, it could lead to an awkward situation in which your rule as chair you would effectively be saying, financial firms, do as i say and not what i did. these are not trivial matters. if the committee was given time to examine your records more carefully before the hearing, i'm sure many of these impressions may have been answered. we would have to explore some of these matters here today. finally, i want to mention, i told you that i was very dissatisfied with the treasury department's level of responsiveness to our letters, both the chairman and mind, as well as letters from our colleagues. you pledged to made to maintain frequent consultation with members of th
.s. embassy in turkey. also there are reports of several people being injured. former new york city mayor ed coach who apparently died as a result of congestive heart failure -- he was 88 years old. at about 8:30, we will examine yesterday's confirmation hearing with a chuckle. for our first 45 minutes, we'll take a look at hillary clinton, almost 1 million miles traveled as she served for a president. we will take a look at her ten- year and to wait how she did. she spent her last day in washington today. call us at -- if you want to send this tweet, do so at @cspanwj. we have had people responding to our question on facebook.com/c- span as well. senator kerrey will be sworn in later on today as well. secretary of state clinton spent her last day as secretary of state. the washington post has this headline -- more analysis in the papers, taking a look at the secretary of state. in our time, we are interested in hearing from you. the numbers -- you can treat us @cspanwj or on facebook. weighing in -- michael hobbs saying -- want to join us on the phone? the numbers will be on the screen. ind
way tonight in new orleans. alex is joining us next from new york city. caller: my comment is -- i am not particularly a sports fan. it seems very repetitive back and forth. as far as the regulation -- my observation, not just about football but hockey and also even baseball -- people seem to like people getting hit and getting beat up. they even like people looking kind of distorted like when they take drugs. i would be in favor if there could be a lot to prevent head injuries or young people being persuaded to do drugs to get onto teams or whatever. it is my commentary to my fellow americans the sunday morning that, it is like gladiatorial combat. . "the hunter games." it is almost like a freak show you enjoy watching human suffering. that is my cheery comment. host: thank you for the call. on the twitter page, there is this. back in 2009, tiki barber testified on the issue of head injuries at the high school and professional lover -- level. [video clip] >> you hear the file but comes from people who think the nfl is not addressing this issue. at the end of the day, it is a player p
-span.org. michael is our last call. salt lake city. democrat. caller: what is a drone? i think people have some sort of misconception about it. it is a remotely highly vehicle, controlled by humans. not much different than if you had an f-16 flying over circling around. more than likely there is somebody on the ground identifying the target. somehow they have to identify the target before they make a strike. so, the either have somebody on the ground or electronic intelligence to find that out. also, like killing bin laden -- they could have used a drug to do that. what is the difference? they still killed him. i think people have a misconception about how remotely piloted vehicle -- what it is, what the function is. and if you -- on the secrecy part -- if you release the information about who you are killing and how you got the information and where they are, the more you release that kind of information, the more our intelligence services suffer. because they are no longer a bird -- able to function in secret. because if you let everything out, it is no longer a secret. it is self defeating. so, a
of thoughtfulness that needs to happen, rather than arbitrary cuts. host: a lot more stories about your largest city, detroit, and its economic issues. what is the future of that city? guest: detroit has many great things going on, young people moving in, some great projects going on. the challenge in detroit is city government. it is not a recent issue. there are good people in the recent administration. this goes back for decades. the city government is unsustainable in terms of its finances. it needs to provide better services. we have had a review team looking at the finances. one of the question it asks is, do we need to take additional steps to get detroit's finances together? -- working better? oddly partner with the city to get that happening? detroit will be a great city again. that is critically important for the future of michigan. caller: what is happening in detroit is disgraceful. look. you run for office. you get in, you get that power, and all good ideas run out of your mind. it seems like all of the government, including state, is bought and sold to the highest bidder. you start off
. philadelphia, pittsburgh, washington, d.c., tampa, portland, and kansas city. going to need folks who are scared about finding out their numbers. we'll have to have them trust us. >> your neighbor in need. >> i have been neglecting my health. all coming together to face their fears. when the day was over, 1000 people met with the doctor. taking charge of their health. these programs have been successful and i want to point out that almost everyone has insurance. i'm sorry, they have jobs. many times, they do not have insurance. in 15 minutes, it takes five members -- five minutes to give you the numbers. for the rest of your life, you know lot more about the major drivers of longevity. their simple, elegant, and seamless. this is the amount of total tobacco that we use in this country. this is something many of the struggle with. this is how i talk about lung disease. when you tell a smoker to stop smoking, the reason it fails is because he reminding them how incompetent they are. you are reminding them how they don't embarrass themselves. people who smoke got addicted and they weren'
students across this country and in the city of chicago walk out and they see the promise of downtown, do they see their future as part of that opportunity or do they see a different future? and that is how we measure success. the two places where we can bridge that gap between where our kids are today and the promise of this city and the promise that this city holds are in the classroom and in the home. president obama understands that to connect all americans to that vision of a promising future requires that we create real ladders of opportunity. i am pleased he has come home to expand on that vision. ladies and gentlemen, let's give the president a chicago welcome. [playing "hail to the chief"] [applause] >> hey, chicago. hello, chicago. hello, everybody. hello, hyde park. [cheers] it is good to be home. it is good to be home. everybody have a seat, y'all relax. it's just me. y'all know me. it is good to be back home. a couple of people i want to acknowledge -- first of all, i want to thank your mayor, my great friend rahm emanuel for his outstanding leadership of the city and this ki
as managing director and chief ynez officer -- chief operating officer at citi units. you have said to our staff that you were not involved in portfolio management. you may not have selected assets that citi invested in or managed in the portfolio, but citigroup organization chart seems to identify you were tied to investment research and other such activities such as liquid operations. during your time on wall street, there are units that you oversaw. those securities include class b funding. it is a product that citi is represented and sold to collect fee and then bet against. others might have been sold that you oversold. -- you oversaw. some alleged were misrepresented to be far safer than they were. you have said that you are responsible for operational activities and management with some are little knowledge of the activities of the units that you staffed. i find that somewhat confusing. your position at citi is considered a trophy position. i hope you can provide some clarity to disprove that you -- that view. i have four questions about your citigroup role at the time you were ther
. host: you cannot find a minimum wage job? caller: jobs in my city are very hard to come by unless you know exactly where to look. i have three scholarships. i'm trying to get a job on campus to help pay my debt. jobs are in very high demand. it is difficult. i am trying. hopefully, with the president's new policies, this could be more of an easy process. host: what is the minimum wage in oregon? caller: it was recently raised by our governor to $8.95. i cannot be certain about that. i've only read one article. host: i know there are websites out there that look at the minimum wage across the states. here's the new york times -- different economic arguments for minimum-wage, something that surely will be debated in the days after last night's state of the union address. on twitter -- let's go to brian in maryland, democrat. caller: good morning. president obama's speech was refreshing. as a proud member of the u.s. armed services that served our country more than 20 years, but we are focusing on domestic agendas and trying to invest money right here in the united. united so that was ve
that president obama traveled back to chicago and a city on track to become of the murder capital of the united states -- again that is "the national journal". this shows the line graph from january 12 -- january 2012 if -- go by the fbi's estimates at a time approaching two hundred 50. that is followed by new york, baltimore, and philadelphia. detroit and los angeles being charted there as well. your thoughts for the next 40 minutes. mark on the democrats' line, what do you think? caller: i agree with the second amendment that we all have the right to bear arms. when it comes to these assault weapons, there are too many shootings with the schools. it has become almost an every day thing. it is creating a panic. i know certain areas are worse than others. the government has a compelling interest to address this. they need to try to put rules on the table, not to take away the second amendment, but to enforce more rules to negate these happenings. host: the president several times reiterating that the proposal deserves a vote. what he think? caller: i agree. congress is our lawmakers. they put t
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
stations, small cities in rural areas. would you implement these reductions -- are these the type of reductions will see as a result of sequestration that would disproportionately affect rural america versus urban america? >> there are definitely risks. they will face a cut of $600 million under sequester, a vast majority will be furloughed for one day for the rest of the year. this is going to reduce air traffic levels across the country, causing delays. it is my understanding that there will be a curtailment of service at low activity airports. there will be impacted and feel the effect of the sequester. >> he mentioned that the air force plans to cut facilities and maintenance project by about half, including cuts to 189 projects. do you have a list? >> i can provide you with that level of detail. it is basically everywhere. >> one of the things i am concerned about, if we do go and the sequestration, i have heard that they may have to reduce flying hours by as much as 18%. and very quickly, can you tell us how how that will affect the air worthiness of our pilots? the reality
. our next caller from jersey city, new jersey. caller: good evening. i just wanted to make a comment. i do think that this whole issue is very much an interesting issue. i do think it is a bit exaggerated. the thing is, things do happen. the whole talk about america's life expectancy may be lower than the other developed countries -- but i think unless we come up with innovative ways to bring it better met, alleviation for the health crisis, only thereafter we can really think about all of the solutions. i guess we are just beating around the bush, as they say. host: avoiding what, exactly? caller: talking about the -- not really the solutions. what to do exactly. host: you would like to hear more recommendations? caller: absolutely. guest: the caller makes a good point. the third part of our report is all about recommendations. we feel that because of the gravity of our findings, our society, our country, our state and local communities really need to do something about this. we get into some detail about what we need to do. it is a call for action. host: tell us about the amount of mo
city. we have got to be more comfortable in talking to people about what works. what is working that other countries are doing. the diversity of the representation in the house will be helpful for that. i think also we have to learn something from how historically brave actions by your predecessors in this caucus played out in the electorate. when were they rewarded? when were they punished? and later rewarded? i cannot tell you how many nights in the white house, every single night before i went to bed, for months and months and months after the 1994 election, i thought about the people who were defeated because they voted for the economic program, because they voted for the assault weapons ban. i knew exactly what happened. i thought a lot about those who survived and why they did. as you look ahead and you decide, what are we going to do about the budget, what are we going to do about having the democrats branded as the party of jobs and innovation for the future? make no mistake about it, the republicans will try very hard not to make it as easy for you to win by-reference.
and our villages and our cities across this country are all full -- are all full. i would love to have president obama interact more and let's stop having suspensions. they say we will not deal with the budget crisis now. we will wait until march to handle things. that is not the way that we can handle this country right now. all american taxpayers are having our own fiscal cliff problems and that cannot be no more. our taxes are going up, our property taxes and food taxes and any kind of hikes of taxes is a challenge for the american workers. host: thanks for your call. guest: i think the sentiment that obama should roll up his sleeves and get to work with congress is one that many members of congress actually would agree with including democrats. he has a little reputation of not reaching out to and interacting with members of congress and a way that hurts his agenda on the hill. at the same time, one chamber has not done a budget for four years and that is the senate and they decided politically it does not make sense and now they have changed that and they will do it. host: what ab
been, we have a devastating level of youth unemployment in cities like yours. let's focus on that because we love and care for people. we do what is good and political but may not be honest economics. host: current federal minimum wage is $7.25. bob in chesapeake, virginia, independent line. caller: representative, the minimum-wage is used as a political football. i think would be a good thing if we would set the minimum wage on all of the jobs in the country as a national need and a global competitive need instead of letting the minimum wage be brought up every so often as a political football. they need to set the minimum wage on all the jobs. then they can eliminate the union hassles and we can be more globally competitive. guest: you are correct it is used as a political football to get you some wonderful movement on your political base. if we were to think like an economist, you would not have a minimum wage. you would allow the market to generate those wages. if you're going to move to a minimum wage, are you going to have the training wage and for those folks who ar
and producing in ge-sun city work -- ge- sensitive markets. we will look at monitoring, maintaining the. t of publicly held germ classes, because there is concern about that. -- the purity of publicly-held germ classes, because there is concern about that. as will mitigate the risk associated when folks want to do things a little bit differently, in the same general space. it is part of managing risk. the long-term risk we will face, with a changing climate -- i will conclude with this. there is no question that the climate is changing. we recently furnished to assessments from usda on the impact of changing climates on agriculture and forestry. the conclusions were pretty obvious. higher temperatures lead to more intense weather patterns. more intense weather patterns lead to greater stress for crops and livestock. and increase tree mortality. we at usda have a responsibility to figure out ways in which we can mitigate the risks of something we really cannot control. when it happens, we cannot control when a drought occurs. we cannot control when a horrible tornado hits, or when flooding
city tennessee, or public in line. caller: yes. i want to make a comment. i think obama and handle -- hagel percent ace two state solution. is that correct or not? guest: at some point, that is their ultimate goal, yes. caller: don't you think that would make the situation worse, they are trying to divide it? the bible says that god is against that. dividing the land of israel. guest: i think that is a whole separate show on what to do in that region. it is far too complex to get into at this point. senator hagel has been very clear that he supports the president's approach to the region. host: talk about when senators are getting prepared. do they get a briefing book? how is that done? guest: they get some of that from the administration. the committee takes a set -- slightly different approach. the committee staff will also look at that. it is not the committee's job to rubber stamp the nominees. they will take their own look and prepare their own materials for specific members that they asked but also generally for the committee. certainly in an instance like this, i think the r
don't want to go city by city for security reasons, when you look at these, we'll look at this and determine how safe they are security-wise? >> state asked us to join a team that other than would look at 19 emb and determine what was needed there in order to better secure those facilities. and i think based on that, it gives us the opportunity to then deploy additional marines if we have to and take additional steps to try to make sure that those embassies are not vulnerable. we do work with the state department when asked to try to provide guidance with regards to security. >> how often is a review done in some of these places, for instance, a benghazi? is it on a -- when the ambassador says, things are getting tougher or every couple of weeks, is it looked at, has this deteriorated or gotten better. what kind of matrix is used? >> the primary matrix has to rest with the state department and the ambassador within that country to be able to review just exactly what is the degree of threats they are confronting and then what actions they should take in order to deal wit
adn from new york city steve mcmahan. thank you to both of the. as we look at the state of the union, what do you think about the tone? what about the term of the president's delivery ended the way he was saying his message? guest: i think he did what many presidents do in the state of the union address, he laid out an agenda for the future. those things tend to be kind of a list. then he built to a crescendo at the end on having a vote on the gun-control measures that he has introduced. i thought it was a terrific state of the union address that did lay out the agenda. republicans know what it is he would like to accomplish. american people know what is at stake. now we will see if congress is willing to act. guest: you had the inaugural and the state of the union. he laid out a pretty aggressive liberal agenda. obviously there will be some differences of opinion that emerge out of this. whether it be the debt ceiling, the sequester, the continuing resolution of getting the budget, the sequence of things the speech set up in terms of the beginning of this course. having said that, i
costing them a lot of money. in new york, it is more about the city of new york than the state of new york. the smoking bans which did not help -- did not hurt businesses. when everybody knew the rules, all the bad restaurants shifted over. -- all the restaurants shifted over. this allows a more sophisticated way of dealing with the socialized costs so will we can share them more easily. if you create rules that everyone can follow, they will all do the right thing. otherwise, people will cherry pick and profits accordingly. i personally think each state will have to find their own way of going on this path. it is worth putting this in a document. asked mike bloomberg if this is good or bad. if we're talking about the impact of sodas comment that was worth the risk politically to get that conversation going. there are many other states. fantastic improvement in some of the major urban areas like philadelphia. when you look at this places, they are simple things done well. real food, social infrastructure, mich.-as its 4x4 tool. what little to do all of view, it ought to be about second opi
and whether there are variations with regards to the possibilities of insurgency depending upon city and region. last comment i would like to address what the united states should contemplate with regards to its own actions in the region. even before your the u.s. government -- even before the u.s. government decided that it was going to participate in a nato exercise to essentially dismantle the gaddafi regime in libya, i knew as that decision was going to be taken that there would be consequences throughout. the region -- muammar gaddafi provided a regime of stability that was provided by his provision of direct economic benefits to the region, not only in terms of investment, but also in terms of direct transfers of ies.y i it was predictable that upon his demised not only with those economic benefits be removed, but that tuareg soldiers would no longer be on the payroll. no longer being on the payroll, they would then have to return to their countries of origin because there were no longer employed. in the context of his demise, two very important arms depots were made available
america to the vast expanses of asia and the great cities of europe and all countries in between, cia officers were there, sometimes in force and sometimes virtually standing alone. and for those 25 years, it was a great honor for me to be a cia officer, as i knew that this country's contributions to security rise in valuable as they were innumerable. following my retirement from the cia in 2005, i had the good fortune to experience other opportunities. for three years, i served as ceo of a private-sector company, where i learned firsthand about fiduciary responsibilities and sound business practices. and for the past four years and i have had the privilege to serve as the president's principal policy advisor on homeland security and counterterrorism. i have had the opportunity to work with some of the finest americans i have ever met. in the intelligence, military, law enforcement, and diplomatic communities, who have dedicated their lives to the safety and security of fellow americans. it is because of the work of those americans serving domestically, and especially those serving in
of the largest cities and in some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online, and that is a pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content, a good percentage of that comes from the united states. there is an appetite, clearly. how much of that will translate to a cable channel again where some of these folks are dedicated online streamers' is a challenge, but we hope we can provide interesting and freshen up content and have some people cross over. host: how will the recent purchase expand the american audience? who will you be able to reach now? >> -- guest: it is an estimated 50 million viewers. obviously it is a great leap forward and a great deal. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the americas. this just opens some eyeballs to us, and we hope it will give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it for those who have not seen it, and again, provide a platform for the core audience we already have. host: it is a 24-hour global news network carried in places like new york
counties and cities do that across the board -- spending reductions generally, they do it with flexibility to the different departments can re reprogrammed-and replace and adjusted. that's the way it should be. host: from twitter -- guest: the keystone xl pipeline is a good point. it has been awhile since the president has delayed a decision on keystone. as bipartisan support and the governor of nebraska has said let's get this rolling and keystone is a great idea. that would be a great first start. permitting some oil exploration and drilling and development is another one in that same sector. you can look at what has happened in north dakota with the amount of drilling and production. another thing the president could do today that would lead to job growth is look at his federal agencies. the federal regulatory agencies have 291,000 employees. 291,000 employees. last year, they issued 4000 new regulations which are thousands of pages of instructions and the federal register. that -- he needs to for -- it makes it impossible for new regulations. he should allow a review and get some of th
the curvature of the earth and hitting new york city on this video with that very odd background music playing. but it just shows an attitude, and i think that we cannot stand idle and tell ourselves that further sanctions have no prospect of success, especially when we saw how effective for that brief period of time where the treasury department was so concerned about the counterfeiting of $100 bills that they actually forced deployment of those financial sanctions on those institutions which the north koreans used in order to have access to hard currency. we saw at that time the result and the protests from north korea, and the result inside north korea when there was not the money to pay the military or carry out the types of programs that they do in terms of their missile and nuclear testing. so it's time to be honest with the american people that frankly our current north korean policy is not working. it hasn't worked for a long time. going forward, we need to move away from that failed north korean policy to one with energy and creativity and focus, and i think we need to learn from what
be to have a city -- a sitting president working for or raising money for a 501c4. >> i have not attempted to separate my comments -- i do represent organizing for action, which is the name of the organization you are referring to. i would simply say as you know, i will not be involved in electoral activity at all. in that sense, it's not to be confused with activity in an election cycle, the types of concerns the campaign finance sector we're talking about here today. as you know, it is devoted to federal and state public policy and issue development advocacy. it will be operating therefore as a social welfare organization. without going into tremendous amount of discussion about people's views of the feasibility of such an enterprise, i would say this -- the business of communicating on issues in this country and involving one's self in the day-to-day business of grass- roots requires resources. the largest issue we all face is in a country of this size and complexity and even with developments like internet communications which have reduced the cost of participation in some respects, th
-american relations. he will reconnect with the city in which he lived as a child. we expect international support from mali. italy, in additional to meeting senior officials, he will have a number of multilateral meetings and meet with european allies. we expect italian authorities will invite some of the key countries for the opposition coalition. the secretary will have a chance to meet with the leadership of the counsel separately. he will meet with turkish officials to discuss viral -- bilateral and multilateral issues that we work on together, including ending the crisis in syria and our ongoing cooperation in the area of counterterrorism. in cairo, he will meet with senior egyptian officials and other key political stakeholders, civil society leaders and with the visiti buss community. to encourage political consistence -- consensus and move forward on economic reform. he will take the opportunity to meet with the arabic secretary on our shared challenges. he will meet with the senior saudi leadership to a trust our cooperation on a broad range of issues. he will have a chance to have a mee
for venturing without permission to the other side of the city. [laughter] second, i started to pay special attention to the plaques on the buildings that recommend -- that recognize the united states of america for lending a hand in rebuilding. i was proud. the marshall plan, imf, and other organizations led by the united states are evidence of our ability to make the right decisions at the right time, taking risks today in the interest of tomorrow. we now face a similar crossroads. we can be complacent or competitive as markets bloom in every corner of the world. with or without us. we could be there to help plant the seeds or we can see the power to others. given the chance to lead a second great american century, we must not just look to the american landscape today. look at the days to come. we must marshal the courage that define the the marshall plan so that we might secure in the future freedom. let's remember the principles of jefferson's time. looking to independence echoing in our time. america's national interest is in leading strongly and it still in doers in this world. let me
and fitting your best city made by side as it happens have certain effects in your permit in certain effects throughout general austin's command. can you give us your sense now, you have a day-to-day basis when engaged in deliberate planning -- can you give us your sense of what the threat daughter and africom and how well-positioned afrcom is. >> the press and africom reliever bob rudd three major areas, one being al qaeda and the islamic mockery of, which is where the french operations and the united states is ongoing. also al-shabaab in somalia a book for her rom and also the ally ray has discussed earlier here. visit the major threats to stability militarily, but of course they have significant other wants and government as well as health issues. >> i think you've touched on something that again is a critical issue that cuts across government capacity to provide basic service, the ability of governments to function is not as, at least to respond to the true nature of the people. one of the issues we talked about is that we have had military training operations that have gone in over the
to school. that did not happen in new york city. that is a different culture. that is what bill clinton was warning barack obama about. be careful because these people really care about their culture and their life and what they do. they care about different things than you do. part of it is cultural. when you ask somebody, or one of your leaders, you ask about the nra, we are viewed as an advocacy organization that stands up for gun owners and the second amendment. that is about 12%. the rest goes to competition, a gun safety, technical information, and a lot of our research goes into boy scouts, girl scout, bringing people into the shooting sport and teaching them to handle guns safely. there are fewer gun accidents today than there were at the beginning of the 20th century but there are a lot more guns. the only people out there teaching gun safety and training people is the national rifle association. i have got to go. [laughter] i have to go but i will take you to a gun show. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite co
, the city to hold 10% your entire working life for your retirement. between jobs and layoffs -- and i have always been fortunate to make as much as college graduates, but between the jobs and layoffs throughout my work life and the clinton era taxes and everything -- i'm not blaming him, i thought he was a good president even though i am a republican, i just want someone's opinion on people my age and why we have so little put away. we are the generation of all the crises and the tail end of that . host: before we get a response from paul taylor, are you still with us? caller: >> i am. host: what has your savings patterns been over the last couple years? caller: i had to quit contributing to my 401k's just to get by with the rising cost of living from 2006 to present i went four years without a pay increase from my employers because they were in a financial struggle as well with the economic hit in 2007 and slow growth to 2009. we finally got a pay increase last year because of somewhat of a comeback in our industry. host: thank you. that age group is critical when it comes to your 401k pl
these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for all americans. i was debating whether it should be johnson or jimmy carter. jimmy carter, in the final history of this country is written, jimmy carter will be among the best up there, not ronald reagan. look what jimmy carter did, by holding to signing treaties with panama, he gave the panama canal back to the panamanians. george bush's father arrested noriega and put him in jail. thank you. host: the washington post editorial page weighs in on the question -- who gets the washington post this morning on past presidents. iowa, democratic caller, lisa. caller: good morning. president roosevelt. he was the first president i can rememberhcane helped elderly people who did not have anything. i think he started social security. he had a disability, but it did not stop him from being the best president we ever had and never will. host: what would your parents etc. this question? >> they would've said the same thing if they were alive
as shopping reminders of the especial -- epidemic in cities. this unspeakable tragedy is affected by countless tragedys that take place in our streets that pass too often unnoticed and that too frequently decimate the lives of our most vulnerable sit zernings our children. every loss is shearting. and inexplicable, yet each one is an outrage. this is why it has affected citizen, hard broken parents and advocates that we are sworn to protect. it's time for each of us to steal our reserve and renew our commitment to respond to this senseless violence with renewed individual lens. we are determined to work with organizations like this one to build a bipartisan consensus for taking decisive action to end begun violence. and we will not rest until we've done everything in our power to prevent future tragedies like the one that took place at sandy hook elementary school. now, of course, there will never be a simple, one size fits all solution for addressing any challenge of this magnitude and confronting all of its underlying causes but we must not allow the size or the complexity of this problem to
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